Tag Archives: Lundy’s Lane

George Crane
Flank Company
1st Regiment Middlesex Militia

George Crane was born in Scotland in 1771. In 1803, at 32 years of age, he was in Upper Canada after retiring from the British Army. By May 6, he was in York (now Toronto) when his path crossed with another ex-military, Thomas Talbot. Talbot had left England early in February with instructions from the Colonial Secretary to the Lieutenant Governor granting him 5,000 acres of land and permission to establish a settlement in the wilds of Upper Canada.

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Flank Company
1st Regiment Middlesex Militia

Alexander Clark
Caldwell’s Rangers

Alexander Clark(e), was born in Brownstown, Michigan, on 10 May 1800.  Alexander’s father was Thomas Alexander Clark(e) who died c 1840 and his mother was Catherine Brown who died c 1802.

After Catherine’s death, Thomas married Catherine’s sister, Mary Brown (d 1863). Alexander’s family remained in Brownstown until he was four years old, when the Huron Indian chiefs in council granted his father a tract of land on the Canadian side, now known as the Clarke Grant and he and his parents moved there in 1804.

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James Vrooman
Glengarry Light Infantry

James Vrooman was the son of Adam, a Captain in Butler’s Rangers who was granted crown land in Queenston. He was the second youngest of seven children and youngest of five sons. His eldest brother was Solomon Secord Vrooman who was in the Lincoln Militia & who inherited his father’s land. He was born on 22 Apr 1794.

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Glengarry Light Infantry

Matthew “Matt” Hancock
Colours of the Crown

Carried the Colours of the Crown, Flag Bearer in the Battle of Lundy’s Lane, perhaps with the 89th Regiment, in the Niagara Region. Born in Ireland in 1784.

Member of the Orange Lodge Brigade.

He has a flat headstone erected in his memory at the Emily Cemetery that has been verified by a local citizen and historian Mike O’Reilly.  Each year in commemoration of his service the local legion places a Canadian Flag at his gravesite on Remembrance Day.

Jonathan Austin
2nd Regiment Norfolk Militia

Jonathan, the second son of Solomon Austin, m Miss Hannah Potts, and had seven children. He and his son John built Austin’s mills in the Lynn Valley.

In the war of 1812, true to their principles of loyalty, the father and four sons (Solomon Jr., Jonathan, Phillip and Moses) shouldered their muskets and marched under Brock to fight the hated “Yankees,” once more. They fought at Malcolm’s Mills (Oakland), Fort Malden, Fort Detroit, Fort Erie, Nanticoke Creek, McCrae House and Lundy’s Lane. In the 2nd Regiment Norfolk Militia Jonathan attained the rank of Captain and his commanding officer was Lieutenant Colonel Robert Nichol. The descendants of this family are the most numerous of any of the families of the settlement.

Sources

Ontario Historical Society

Officers of the British forces in Canada during the War of 1812-15

Titus Williams
Flank Company
2nd Regiment Norfolk Militia

Colonel Titus Williams, born Long Island, 22 November, 1790, son of Captain Jonathan Williams, of the British Army. Received Ensign’s Commission in the 2nd Regiment Norfolk Militia. Volunteered on 27 June 1812, the day of the war’s outbreak, appointed Lieut., in Left Flank Company. Commanded a detachment of Norfolk men at Detroit. Became Captain and Adjutant of the 2nd Regiment Norfolk Militia at Detroit some time later. Was afterwards captured by Americans on Niagara River, sentenced to be executed, but was liberated in May, 1814. Immediately appointed Adjutant of the 4th Regiments Norfolk Militia and was at Lundy’s Lane. Then placed in command of the 103rd Regulars at Dover and Ryerse.

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Solomon Austin
2nd Regiment Norfolk Militia

Solomon Austin was originally from North Carolina. He was a private in the Queen’s Rangers and served all through the American Revolutionary War. On one occasion, at least, he exhibited conspicuous bravery. This was at the battle of the Horseshoe. The standard-bearer was killed and the flag fell to the ground and was in danger of being lost. Solomon Austin leaped forward, and grasping the standard bore it bravely till the close of the action. After the battle Major-General Simcoe inquired his name, praised him in public before the marshalled company, and gave him to understand that if he could ever be of service to him afterwards his bravery would not be forgotten.

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2nd Regiment Norfolk Militia

Richard Hatt
Indian Lands
5th Regiment Lincoln Militia

Richard Hatt II was a Businessman, judge, office holder, militia officer, postmaster and the recognized founder of Dundas.

Richard emigrated in March 1792 arriving in Canada that June. He moved to Upper Canada and by December 1794 was engaged in the Mercentile Business.

Richard Hatt’s father, Richard Hatt I, told his son  that to be Industrious, obliging, and to act with strict fidelity, was the key to success in life. At the time of his father arriving in the spring of 1796,  Richard was a partner of McKay & Co. Almost immediately, Richard decided to move out of Niagara-on-the-Lake, and as early as 1796, settled in Ancaster Township and opened a General Store. He seemed to be more interested in processing goods rather than just provisioning.

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Indian Lands
5th Regiment Lincoln Militia